Creating a Culture of Health and Fitness

People who live in California spend on average almost 90 minutes per week on running, swimming, bicycling, lifting weights and other measures to stay healthy and fit, which is close to the minimal amount of time recommended by the U.S. government, and more than the residents of all other states seem able to manage. While personal wellness depends on multiple factors that can be hard to calculate, it is clear that besides geographic diversity, culture also plays a role.

Why It’s Important to Keep Up Your Exercise Routine in Bad Weather

There are countless obstacles to outdoor exercising in the winter months. It’s also a time for easy excuses. But what a shame to see that hard work you’ve put in all year go to waste because it’s less pleasant outside. Admittedly, walking or running in foul weather is not everyone’s cup of tea. The temptation to remain sedentary is extra persuasive then, but the effects become evident all too soon, especially when you add in the extra food intake that seems unavoidable during the holidays.

How to Choose an Activity Tracker

You’ve heard all about how important physical activity is, not just for weight control but for many other aspects of good health. Perhaps you’ve tried to exercise regularly or at least walk more often. So why would you want some sort of monitor to track your every move? That’s what I used to think. But now, for myself and for many of my patients, I know the benefits.

Exercise Can Make You See the World in a Different Light

Being physically active has countless health benefits. It helps prevent weight problems and reduces the risk of serious illnesses like heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. But according to a recent study from Canada, regular exercise can also improve how people perceive the world around them. Especially those suffering from anxiety or depression can profit from workouts or even just short brisk walks, researchers found.

Why Are Carbohydrates So Confusing?

Carbohydrates seem to be a source of confusion for most health-conscious people, including athletes and fitness fanatics. Many active people don’t know what to eat. They just think they should avoid pasta, bagels, juice, bananas, and sugar, even if these foods are not problematic for them. Most of the anti-carb hype is targeted not toward the fit crowd but the masses of overfat and underfit folks whose bodies do not handle carbohydrates as well.

Sports Nutrition: What’s Old? What’s New?

Centuries ago, warriors (the original athletes) ate the hearts of lions. Today, athletes seek out energy drinks and protein shakes. Clearly, times have changed. In case you are wondering what else is old – and new – when it comes to sports nutrition, I’ve compiled this update to resolve confusion and help you fuel for success.