For Healthy Aging, Stay in Control

Loss of independence can happen suddenly through a catastrophic event or insidiously through natural decline. But most seniors don’t prepare well for either. They believe they can stay in their home indefinitely and take care of themselves, even if that means to struggle on their own. Thankfully, there is assistance available that enables people to have both, remaining reasonably independent and being cared for to the extent it is needed.

How to Avoid the Retirement Trap

Well-to-do older adults who are reasonably healthy have many more options to fill their ‘golden years’ with activities and pursuits than their forbearers could ever imagine. By contrast, insufficient financial security and chronic diseases can lead to a rather precarious endgame. For most retirees, it will be something in between.

Of Loss and Letting Go

Fear of aging, including financial concerns, deteriorating physical and mental health, loss of loved ones, social isolation, and the progressive inability to cope with daily tasks and challenges can make people dread the so-called “golden years” rather than embrace them. Surveys show that most adults are more afraid of losing their independence in their twilight years than they are of death.

Sleep Well – Your Life May Depend on It

An unfortunate part of our modern-day busy lifestyle is chronic sleep deprivation. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), lack of sleep has become a major public health concern, with insufficient rest being linked to medical problems, accidents and occupational hazards. People who regularly stay awake for too long are at a higher risk of developing illnesses like high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes, cancer, and also mental issues like depression and memory loss, the agency warns.

A New Year’s Resolution: Be Less Wasteful with Time

We all get routinely lost in unnecessary activities, in stuff that is oftentimes frivolous and silly. A lot of time and energy is wasted on complaining, gossiping, antagonizing, fighting, and being plainly miserable, or on doing things that yield no real benefits, like reading or watching so-called “news” about people and events unrelated to us, or updating our social media status with irrelevant information.