The Treats Can Be the Scariest Part of Halloween

As every year, millions of American kids will go from door to door this week, dressed up in imaginative costumes, asking for chocolates and candy. As every year, adults will be happy to comply, filling entire baskets and pails with the kind of stuff that we all know is not good for the health of anyone, let alone growing youngsters. Obviously, a once-a-year-occasion can hardly be blamed for the childhood obesity crisis we are facing, not just in the United States but increasingly around the globe. However, the ever-growing consumption of sugary foods and drinks, resulting in an array of chronic illnesses not traditionally associated with children, such as diabetes, heart disease, liver disease, and cancer, is a serious worry.

Promoting Bone Health Can’t Start Too Soon, Scientists Say

Insufficient Calcium and Vitamin D intake during childhood and adolescence increases the risk of osteoporosis later in life, according to a new study by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Unfortunately, many youngsters don’t get enough of these important nutrients in their diet, and sedentary lifestyles and indoor activities like watching television or playing video games don’t help.

Kids Gain More Weight When Out of School, Study Finds

The summer months should be a time when children are especially active, play sports, enjoy the outdoors, and perhaps even eat better because there are more occasions for family dinners. In other words, it should be a time when they are their healthiest. Not so, a new study from Harvard University found. In fact, it is during school vacations that many kids put on extra pounds.

The American Diet Is Shortening Our Children’s Lives

The poor dietary habits of today’s children are contributing to their obesity, chronic illness, and ill health. They are also laying a foundation for poor academic performance, chronic disease later in life, violent behavior, and premature death. But children are not making these choices on their own; children’s dietary habits are ingrained by their parents.

Dying to Be Thin

Do you feel fat? Well, guess what? Fat is not a feeling. For some people, though, even the thought of feeling full, bloated, or heavier than they should be conjures up a wide range of emotions. The words, “I feel fat,” especially when spoken by those with eating disorders, are saying something else.